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D Day

We never thought it could come to this but we are forced to leave the expedition whenever an airplane from Kenn Borek can get to us. We are currently 194 km from the coast of Canada and have been given a May 12 deadline for an ice pick up. We have tried to get an extension but the answer is no. Where ice pick ups possible in the past few years as late as June 13 now due to unpredictable weather in combination with arctic ice conditions, this date has been set much earlier since it is too risky to land on ice much later in the season. We are currently dealing with challenging conditions, many leads of open water, problematic pressure ridges and add to that a cocktail of zero visibility, accumulative snow, easterly drift again and strong winds as a series of storms have been nailing us during the last 11 days.
The road ahead is too unpredictable to risk without a safety net of a pick up in case of an emergency, an uncrossable lead or pressure ridge. Through the Canadian Ice Survey we have been given updates and know that some more difficult terrain is ahead of us as the ice collides and stacks up vertically against the coast. The storms and relentless southwest winds has mobilized the ice and it is breaking up. You can tally the distances from our last 10 days, and you will see we can’t stick to progress despite committing to long and hard days in adverse weather and ice conditions. We have given it our best effort.
This sadly leaves us to only one conclusion, the hardest one to make, and to take the last flight before Kenn Borek shuts down for the season.
This expedition has never been about a new route, a record or any kind of polar laurels but our aim has always been to simply show and tell how treacherous and spectacular the Arctic is and what is at stake. In these 40 days here, I believe we have given the world the best of our impressions in words and image and soon in film. The Arctic is incredible yet fragile and we desperately need to protect and preserve what remains left of it and I feel we have been successful in this. We are very fortunate to have been part of this expedition and for Plant for the Planet to commit and support to this experience. We dealt with adverse conditions that hindered us in a brutal way but also gave us an opportunity to witness and document what is at stake as we have crossed the various latitudes on our way south. We drifted 175 km to the east, 40 km to the North, had 3 major long lasting blizzards but we still manage to ski over 500 km. We continue skiing and documenting until the airplane lands which at this point is still uncertain because, yes once again, the visibility is zero. I will keep updating this blog until we are in Resolute Bay in Canada. Thank you all for your incredible support, this has meant and still means a lot to us..